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Missouri State Government 
Annual Recycling Report 
Fiscal Year 2011 




Prepared by the State of Missouri, 
Office of Administration 



Acknowledgements 



Published by the State of Missouri, Office of Administration, Division of Purchasing and Materials Management. 

Special thanks to the Department of Natural Resources ' — Solid Waste Management Program, Missouri Interagency 
Recycling Committee (MIRC), department recycling coordinators and purchasing staff who contributed to this report. 
The Missouri State Recycling Program also wants to thank all state employees for their ongoing efforts to reduce, reuse, 
recycle, and buy recycled-content products. 

State of Missouri 
Office of Administration 
Division of Purchasing and Materials Management 
301 W. High Street, P.O. Box 809 
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0809 
http://oa.mo.gov/purch/recypro.html 

Questions, comments or suggestions regarding this report or the State Recycling Program may be directed to the State 
Recycling Coordinator. 

Robert Didriksen 
PH: 573.751.3384 
E-mail: RobertDidriksen(a),oa.mo.gov 

Recycling Symbol on Cover Page 

The "chasing arrows " recycling symbol is internationally recognized and was born out of a national design competition 
in the United States in 1970 - the same year as the nation 's first Earth Day. Many people associate recycling with the act 
of tossing a can, bottle, or other material into a recycling container; however, this is only one part of the entire recycling 
process. 

The recycling symbol appearing on the cover of this year 's report provides a more detailed accounting of the entire 
"recycling loop " and offers a better understanding of the important role recycling plays in Missouri 's economy as 
evidenced by the following economic data: 

• "Scrap & Waste " exports regularly exceed $100 million per quarter (MO Economic Research & Information Center) 

• Employs over 28, 000 workers (2005 MO Recycling Economic Information Study) 

• Produces annual sales over $5 billion (2005 MO Recycling Economic Information Study) 

• Annual payroll over $707 million (2005 MO Recycling Economic Information Study) 



Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon 



Governor 




Kelvin Simmons 

Commissioner 



State of Missouri 
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION 

Division of Purchasing sind Materials Management 
301 West High Street, Room 630 
Post Office Box 809 
Jefferson Cirv, Missouri 65102 0809 
(573) 75 1 -2387 Fax: (573) 526-98 1 7 
TITJ: (800) 735-2966 Voice: (800) 735-2466 
www.oa.mo.gov/purch 



James Miiuski 

Director 



January 1, 2012 

To the Members of the General Assembly of the State of Missouri, 

In accordance with RSMo 34.031, the Office of Administration is submitting the Fiscal Year 
201 1 (FY1 1) Annual Recycling Report to summarize state government's accomplishments in the areas of 
recycling, waste reduction, and recycled content product procurement far the period of July I, 2010 
through June 30, 201 1 . 

State law directs state agencies to implement policies for recycling, waste reduction, and 
procurement of recycled content products. The State Recycling Program, administered by the Office of 
Administration, Division of Purchasing and Materials Management, is responsible for assisting state 
agencies in these areas. The State Recycling Coordinator works cooperatively with the Missouri 
Interagency Recycling Committee (MIRC) to facilitate recycling and waste reduction by state employees. 

Due to the efforts of state employees and MIRC, the Recycling Program experienced a successful 
year in FY1 1 as evidenced by a 71% increase in recycling revenues generated when compared to FY 10. 
FYH revenues also marked the highest one-year total in the program's history. The recycling efforts of 
state government continue to reduce the amount of waste generated at state facilities and the related costs 
of waste disposal. Waste reduction achievements of several agencies are summarized on pages 1 1 - 14 
of this year's report. 

We appreciate the support of the General Assembly in our recycling efforts. 



Sincerely, 




Kelvin L. Simmons 
Commissioner of Administration 



Table of Contents 



I. Missouri State Recycling Program Background and Structure (p. 5) 

• What is the Missouri State Recycling Program (MSRP)? 

• Who is the MSRP? 

• What is the Missouri Interagency Recycling Committee (MIRC)? 

• Who is the MIRC? 

H. FYll Overview (p. 6-18) 

Collection of Recyclables (p. 6 - 10) 

• Local Recycling Services Contracts — Jefferson City & Kansas City 

• Statewide Recycling Services 

• FY1 1 Department Reports of Materials Recycled 

• Measuring Environmental Savings of Materials Recycled 

FYll Annual Recycling Awards (p. 11) 

State Agency Waste Reduction / Recycling Accomplishments (p. 12-14) 

• Remanufactured Toner Cartridges: State Agency Savings 

• Tire Recycling: A Collaborative Effort 

• Reuse on the Rise 

• RecycleMania Tournament 

• State Fair Recycling 

• Avoided Costs of Waste Disposal 

Recycled Content Procurement (p. 15-17) 

• Recycling Program Guidelines for Buying Recycled 

• Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines: Recycled Product Categories 

• State Agencies "Close the Loop" with Paper Procurement 

• FY1 1 Department Reports for Recycled Content Procurement 

Missouri's State Recycling Fund (p. 18) 

• Summary of Revenues & Expenses 

• Sources of Revenue 

• Contributions to the Heating Assistance Program (Utilicare) 

III. Missouri State Recycling Program Goals (p. 19) 

IV. Recycling Resources (p. 20) 



p. 4 



I. Missouri State Recycling Program Structure 



What is the Missouri State Recycling Program? 

The Missouri State Recycling Program (MSRP) 
was established in 1989 when legislation added 
sections 34.031 and 34.032 to Chapter 34 of the MO 
Revised Statutes. The purpose of the MSRP is to 
assist State of Missouri government agencies with: 

• Procurement of products manufactured with 
recycled materials. 

• Coordinating waste reduction strategies. 

• Overseeing the collection of recyclables by 
establishing recycling services contracts. 



Who is the MSRP? 

There are three components to the MSRP's 
organizational chart. 

The state recycling coordinator is dedicated to the 
planning and administration of recycling and waste 
reduction activities. 

The Missouri Interagency Recycling Committee 

serves an important purpose by providing input on 
recycling initiatives and communicating with state 
employees about various recycling programs. 

The efforts of state employees to recycle ensures 
the success of any recycling initiative. State employ- 
ees that recycle are considered a part of the MSRP. 



Recy 




What is the Missouri Interagency Recycling 
Committee? 

The Missouri Interagency Recycling Committee 
(MIRC) was established in 1994. It was recognized 
the MSRP needed a way to communicate 
procurement and recycling policies throughout state 
government. MIRC is a vital component of the 
MSRP and meets regularly to discuss issues dealing 
with recycling collection, waste reduction, recycling 
market conditions and recycled product 
procurement. 



Who is MIRC? 

The Recycling Committee is composed of 
representatives from various state departments 
(executive, judicial, and legislative). To learn more 
about recycling in your department, please contact 
your MIRC member. 

A list of members is located on the internet at 
www.oa.mo.gov/purch/recycling/mirc.pdf 



p. 5 



II. FY11 Overview: Collection of Recyclables 

Local Recycling Services Contracts 

During Fiscal Year 201 1 (FY11), the Missouri State Recycling Program (MSRP) administered two local 
recycling services contracts. The Jefferson City and Kansas City areas were provided recycling services under 
these contracts for recycling of office paper and cardboard. In the Jefferson City area, the contract also provided 
state agencies with an option to recycle plastic bottles and aluminum cans. Charts on this page provide additional 
information about the past three fiscal years. 

Jefferson City 



As a result of state agency recycling activities under the Jefferson 
City contract, $82,537 in revenue was generated for the State 
Recycling Fund. This represents a 38% increase over the amount 
of revenue generated in FY 10. One of the materials contributing 
to this growth was mixed paper where an additional 141,682 
pounds was recycled during FY1 1. 

With state office consolidations, the number of locations on the 
loose cardboard collection route decreased to forty-five; however, 
collections increased by 45,053 lbs. during the FY1 1 period. Total 
cardboard collected including baled and loose material amounted 
to an estimated 603,825 lbs. This amount includes 89,614 lbs. of 
baled cardboard collected from the Truman Building and the 
Highway Patrol warehouse. This means that on average more than 
1 1,500 lbs. of cardboard is recycled per week by state employees 
in the capital city. 

During the third full year of commingled beverage container 
recycling, four new locations were added to the collection route 
bringing the total number of locations to thirty -five. State agencies 
recycled a total of 16,459 lbs. of aluminum cans and 1 1,724 lbs. of 
plastic bottles in FY1 1. 

The subcontractor, Kingdom Projects (a sheltered workshop), 
provided loose cardboard collection services and sorted commin- 
gled beverage containers at their recycling facility. 



FY09-FYI1 Paper Recycled: Jefferson City 



1,500,000 



1,450,000 




FY09-FY11 Cardboard Recycled: JeffersonCiry 



620,000 



580,000 



558,772 



460,000 



Kansas City 



FY09 - FYll Aluminum & Plastic Bottles Recycled: Jefferson City 




Aluminum ■ Plastic 



FY09-FY11 Paper& Cardboard Recycled: KansasCiry 




FY09 

■ Cardboard 



FY10 
l Mixed Office Paper 



During FY1 1, the Kansas City contract offered state agencies the oppor- 
tunity to recycle cardboard and mixed office paper. State employees in 
Kansas City increased their recycling of paper to 72,144 lbs. up more 
than 2% from the FY 1 period which saw a nearly doubling of the paper 
being recycled from the FY09 period. The quantity of paper recycled 
was nearly enough to fill two 48-foot tractor trailers. 



p. 6 



Statewide Recycling Services 

The Missouri State Recycling Program (MSRP) coordinated two no-cost statewide recycling services for state 
agencies in FY1 1. These convenient services allowed state employees to recycle printer cartridges or rechargeable 
batteries. In addition, the Office of Administration's Division of Purchasing and Materials Management adminis- 
tered two fee-based contracts for document destruction and lamp recycling. 



No-Cost Services 

Printer Cartridge Recycling 

As is seen in many Missouri communities, state agencies have 
options for recycling of their printer cartridges. The chart to the 
right details only those recycling activities where state agencies 
used the State Recycling Program's printer cartridge collection 
service. Information about the numbers of printer cartridges 
returned to the manufacturer by state agencies is not currently 
captured, so the quantities are not accounted for in this chart. 

Rechargeable Battery Recycling 

In its seventh year, the rechargeable battery recycling service 
recycled 4,300 lbs. of rechargeable batteries. Over the past seven 
years, Missouri state government efforts have resulted in the 
recycling of 32,025 lbs. of rechargeable batteries. Thirty -eight 
locations throughout Missouri utilized this service in FY1 1 . 




FY09 - FYll Document Destruction Totals 



1,400.000 



1,200,000 



1.000,000 



800,000 



a- 600,000 



400,000 



200,000 



1,253,180 



1,074,154 



-954,1-15- 




FY09 



FY10 



FYll 



FY09 - FYll Lamps Recycled 



30,000 



I 25,000 



§ 15,000 



5,000 




FY09 



FY10 

I Incandescent ■ Fluorescent 



FYll 



Fee-Based Services 

Shredding & Records Disposal Contract 

This fee based service contract provided state agencies 
throughout Missouri an opportunity to have confidential 
documents destroyed. Costs for services varied and was 
based on document volume and the location of the state 
agency. The chart to the left shows 17% growth of this 
service during FY1 1 . 

Lamp & Ballast Recycling Contract 

This contract allows for the recycling of fluorescent and 
incandescent lights and related equipment (i.e., ballasts), as 
well as non-rechargeable batteries. The number of fluores- 
cent lamps recycled in FY1 1 grew by an astounding 188%. 
While the steady decline in the numbers of incandescent 
lights recycled continued through FY1 1. This change in 
recycling rates is likely attributable to the installation of 
more energy efficient lighting in state facilities by Facilities 
Management. 

p. 7 



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Totals Reported 
by Agency 


Tin / Steel Cans 


Textiles 


Telephone 
Books 


Styrofoam 


Scrap Metal 


Rubber, Scrap 
Tires 


Plastic 


Newsprint 


Mixed Office 
Paper 


Mercury Devices 


Media, Storage 


Magazines & 
Catalogs 


Glass 


Food- Yard 
Waste 


FJectronic Scrap 


Commingled 
Materials 


Carpet Tiles 


Cardboard 


Batteries- 
Recharge 


Batteries-Non 
Recharge 


Ballasts 


Aluminum 


Number of 
Pounds 
Recycled 


o 














O 




n 


















n 








© 


MOSERS 


332,212 










20,000 




o 


| 2,340 




n 










300,000 








o 


9,860 








C5 


4 ct ripiiltiiFP 

i\ 1Z 1 ILUILUI C 


86,037 


© 




© 




62,861 


OS 
© 


Os 
SO 

in 


'jj 
m 
u\ 


n 


| 9,760 






© 


Os 
© 










n 


| 7,935 


K> 
00 

ut 


© 


2,576 


OS 
00 
tsl 


Conservation 


8,397,494 


931,622 


© 

ON 






461,102 


6,940 


(I 


| 76,578 


65,114 


n 


363,772 






1,087 




2,981,500 




92,760 




n 


3,270,864 


3,533 






n 


141,816 


Corrections 


1,623 














O 




n 


1,200 




© 














o 


m 






o 


Elementary & 
Secondary Educ. 


so 
in 














O 




n 




OS 

© 














o 


iti 

UI 






n 


Health & Senior 

Services 


246,695 














o 




n 


246,695 


















n 








n 


.Ttll C 111 1 V \l 1 l7I,«IC 


343,712 












8,840 


30,670 




260,000 








34,670 


4,570 














1,037 


3,925 


Northwest 
Missouri State 
University 


6,924 














n 


so 
SO 
£t 




n 


5,930 


















n 








n 


Insurance, Finan. 
Inst., Prof. Reg. 


'ji 














o 




n 


















o 


Ui 

OS 






o 


Office of State 
Courts Admin. 


166,611 


i -j 
i j 




'71 
so 


L/l 

© 


5,590 


1,140 


12,921 


6,984 


n 


90,852 






1,893 








m 




n 


44,399 


00 






1,501 


Mental Health 


173,240 


SO 
1 j 




OS 
UI 


Kl 
'VI 


33,620 


1,700 


O 


| 8-146 


2,376 


o 


| 78,197 






3,010 


5,721 


7,235 


so 
OC 


2,725 




o 


19,364 


Ui 
Ni 
SO 






n 


| 8,431 


Natural Resources 


118,013 




£t 






80,878 




o 






n 




8,866 














n 


7,658 


1,639 


Ul 

OS 


18,545 


n 


00 


Office of 
Administration 


505,658 


3,505 




NJ 
—J 




332,695 


141,088 


o 


© 
© 


s» 

© 


o 


2,583 




© 


iti 
<t 

Os 






^1 






n 


21,000 


3,382 






n 


00 


Public Safety 


791,440 










15,160 




o 




n 


776,280 


















n 








n 


Revenue 


1,427 














o 


1,427 




n 


















o 








rs 


Social Services 


10,779,260 


ON 
© 




NJ 
00 

© 




8,481,826 


1,501,740 


3,520 




n 


60,630 | 




2,266 


2,300 




40,000 


7,240 






n 


230,600 


7,095 


© 

00 


so 
00 

© 


440,011 


Transportation 


□ 


936,981 


ce 
4^ 


2,045 


^1 
L/l 


9,493,732 


1,661,608 


149,115 


75,079 


4,734,370 


4^ 


13,986 


9,096 


40,451 


3,333,382 


125,564 


95,500 


20,000 


4,218,895 


16,763 


It) 
'Jl 


23,138 


613,431 


Totals by 

Ivla ie 1 1 a 1 



p. 8 



FY11 Department Reports of Materials Recycled (cont.) 



Contractual Reporting / Surplus Property 
Summary Information for Table on Page 8 

Total pounds recycled by agencies utilizing the Jefferson City and 
Kansas City recycling services contracts as well as the document 
destruction contract are summarized in the table to the right. 
These figures are reported as cumulative totals due to contract 
reporting. Data is reported by building and it is not feasible to 
break out data by agency where there are multiple agencies in the same building. 



rill Recycling 
Contract Totals 


Jetterson City 


ivuiisiis Oity 


Document 
Destruction 


Paper 


1,513,147 


72,144 


1,253,180 


Cardboard 


603,825 


3,390 




Aluminum 


16,459 






Plastic 


11,724 







KYI 1 

Surplus 
Property 
Totals 


Carpet Tiles 


20,000 


Electronic Scrap 


117,653 


Media, Storage (adjusted) 


2,366 



Total pounds recycled by agencies utilizing State Surplus Property is 
summarized in the table to the left. For the past three years the State 
Recycling Program has been working with Surplus Property to measure 
surplus materials that are recycled. 



Number of Items and Gallons Recycled Table 



Number of Items 
Recycled 


Books, Bound 
Publications 


Cell Phones 


Fluorescent 
Lamps 


Incandescent 
Lamps 


Printer 
Cartridges 


Fuel/Oil Filters 


Pallets 


Number of Gallons Recycled 


Insurance, Financial Inst., 
Prof. Reg. 










6 






Anti- 
freeze 


Diesel / 
Gasoline 


Oil, 

Cooking 


Oil, 
Motor 


Paint 


Transmis 
sion Oil 


Northwest Missouri State 
University 






8,495 




576 












500 






Labor & Industrial 
Relations 










34 








Elementary & Secondary 
Education 






362 




7 






Treasurer's Office 










146 






Agriculture 










12 






Conservation 


7,010 


137 


2,223 




6 












2,630 






Corrections 


1,272 


41 


10,439 




2,278 


240 


3,969 


160 




1,435 


5,066 


630 




Economic Development 










12 








Health & Senior Services 




10 






60 






Mental Health 




26 


35 


2 


565 




173 






570 


389 






Natural Resources 




14 


774 




708 


2 


6 








392 






Office of Administration 




26 


28,860 


24 


5 




660 




Public Safety 




1 


3,238 




732 


5,914 


746 


400 




1,150 


7,928 




1,000 


Revenue 










2 








Social Services 










301 






Transportation 




375 


5,471 


685 


1,027 


100 


3,130 


360 


2,675 




98,592 






TOTALS 


8,282 


630 


59,897 


711 


8,676 


6,256 


8,684 


920 


2,675 


3,155 


115,497 


630 


1,000 



Note on Total Printer Cartridges: 2,199 printer cartridges were recycled by employees using a statewide service for this item. 
This figure is only reflected in the TOTALS of this table. 



p. 9 



Measuring the Environmental Savings of Materials Recycled* 



The Department of Natural Resources' Division of Energy utilized the Environmental Protection 
Agency's Waste Reduction Model (WARM) as a way to measure the environmental savings of materi- 
als recycled by state agencies in FY1 1 . Essentially WARM is a life-cycle analysis tool that has been in 
development for over 10 years. 

The WARM model helps us to better understand the benefits of alternative end-of-life waste manage- 
ment decisions such as recycling. This model is a lifecycle assessment tool which considers the energy 
usage and greenhouse emissions from raw material extraction until product disposal. This includes 
material assessment, all product transportation, manufacturing, and disposal. The model compares 
different disposal scenarios such as recycling, landfill, incinerating, composting, and source reduction. 

The following carbon dioxide and energy reduction estimates include a majority of the materials listed 
in the tables on page 8 and top of page 9 of this report. The WARM model was not used to calculate 
environmental savings for information appearing in the "Number of Items and Gallons Recycled Table" 
on page 9 of this report. A complete list of materials excluded from the FY1 1 calculations is provided at 
the bottom of this page. 

Carbon Dioxide Reductions Related to Recycling* 

State of Missouri recycling efforts resulted in an estimated reduction of greenhouse gasses of 48,288 
MTCO2E (metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent). This is equivalent to . . . 

• Removing annual emissions from 8,844 passenger vehicles 

• Conserving 5,481,036 gallons of gasoline 

• Conserving 20,119,971 cylinders of propane used for home barbeques 

• Conserving 252 railway cars of coal 

Energy Reductions Related to Recycling* 

The amount of material recycled by state employees in FY1 1 also resulted in an estimated reduction in 
energy use of 578,061,000,000 (nearly 600 billion) BTUs. This amount of energy is equivalent to . . . 

• Conserving 5,389 households' annual energy consumption 

• Conserving 99,666 barrels of oil 

• Conserving 4,651,069 gallons of gasoline 

*Department of Natural Resources' Division of Energy calculated these estimates utilizing the EPA's WARM model. 

Following is a list of materials collected by state agencies in FY1 1 that were not included in the WARM model calculations: 

Books/Bound Publications; Cell Phones; Fluorescent Lamps; Incandescent Lamps; Printer Cartridges; Fuel/Oil Filters; 
Pallets; Anti-freeze; Diesel/Gasoline; Cooking Oil; Motor Oil; Paint; Transmission Oil; Styrofoam; Mercury Devices; Stor- 
age Media; Batteries (rechargeable/non-rechargeable); and Ballasts. 

The 125,564 lbs. of electronic scrap was processed with the WARM model based on the assumption that this figure 
represented personal computers. 



Missouri State Recycling Program Annual Awards 

Each year the State Recycling Program accepts nominations for the Annual Recycling Award. Employees, departments, 
or agencies are eligible to be nominated for outstanding contributions made in the areas of recycling collection, waste 
reduction, and/or recycled content procurement. Members of the Missouri Interagency Recycling Committee review the 
nominations and vote for an individual and agency award. The State Recycling Program encourages nominators to submit 
information demonstrating the value of the nominee's recycling efforts. Value could include costs avoided, revenue 
generated, ongoing leadership/commitment/passion/enthusiasm, environmental benefits, etc. 

FY11 Annual Recycling Awards 

Individual Award: Douglas Dunn, Missouri Department of Natural Resources 

During the fiscal year, Doug not only ensured recycling happened within the Department of 
Natural Resources, but also helped to facilitate recycling for other state agencies. In particu- 
lar Doug helped to coordinate shipment of a load of fluorescent lamps from Social Services, 
the Capitol, and the Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. His efforts saved 
these state agencies money and insured these potentially toxic lamps were properly recycled. 
His efforts insured nearly 5,000 fluorescent lamps were recycled in FY1 1. 

Doug was cognizant of making every effort to recycle materials that were no longer needed 
by the department when consolidating warehouse space during the year. Over a ton of paper 
was recovered and numerous other items were diverted from the landfill during this process. 

L. to R. Governor Nixon, Douglas Dunn 

Agency Award: Northwest Missouri State University — Community Recycling Project 

Northwest Missouri State University (Northwest) is the recipient of this year's team 
award. Collaboration and cooperation are recurring themes in Northwest's nomination. 

For many years Northwest has recycled paper, cardboard, magazines, and newspapers 
by utilizing an on-campus pelletizing process that allows these materials to be used as 
an alternative fuel in its boiler plant. These recycled paper pellets along with wood 
chips allowed Northwest to produce almost half of its total 2009-2010 energy needs. 

Recently Northwest in cooperation with the City of Maryville launched the "Reduce 
Your Paw Print: Taking it to the Community" campaign to offer glass and paper 
recycling opportunities to the community of Maryville. This project involved numer- 
l. to r. John viau, Governor Nixon, Leziee Johnson ous departments at the University and a great deal of cooperation with the City of 
Maryville. Their teamwork resulted in four custom collection containers - designed and built by university staff - being 
placed throughout the community. Since the project was launched a request for a fifth collection container was made by a 
local hospital. 

Northwest has taken a leadership role with recycling that has not only been beneficial to the university, but the businesses 
and citizens of Maryville, as well as the students who are learning - first-hand - about the value of recycling. 

Honorable Mention 

The State Recycling Program thanks those who took the time to make a nomination and at the same time wants to 
recognize the patience, passion, and persistence that the nominees have exercised with their efforts to reduce, 
reuse, and recycle state government waste. 

State Agency Honorable Mention 

Ozark Correctional Center — Missouri Department of Corrections 

p. 11 





II. FYll Overview: State Agency Waste Reduction / 
Recycling Accomplishments 

Remanufactured Toner Cartridges: State Agency Savings 



FY09- FYll: Combined Agency Savings from Purchase of 
MVE Remanufactured Printer Cartridges 



$250,000 



$150,000 



$50,000 



Ml 




For over 1 years Missouri Vocational Enterprises (MVE) has 
offered a toner cartridge remanufacturing service for state agencies. 
This service has provided state agencies an opportunity to realize 
significant savings and reduce waste by reusing toner cartridges. 

The chart to the right illustrates the combined agency savings over 
the past three years for agencies that purchased remanufactured toner 
cartridges from MVE. Savings are estimated by calculating the 
difference in price between MVE toner cartridges and non-recycled 
toner cartridges available from the office supplies contract. From 
FY09 - FY1 1 state agencies saved over $500,000 dollars by utilizing 
this MVE's service. 

Multiple State Agencies Benefit from Tire Recycling Services 

I An agreement made in 1 995 between the Missouri Department of Corrections 
(DOC) and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has allowed DOC's 
Missouri Vocational Enterprises (MVE) program to operate a tire recycling plant 
at the Central Missouri Correctional Center (Church Farm) in Jefferson City. 

DNR agreed to purchase the equipment for tire recycling provided MVE would 
operate the recycling equipment. Under the agreement offendors are sent to clean up 
dump sites identified by DNR. The tires are taken by truck to Church Farm, where 
they are put through a grinding machine. Chips from the tires go up a conveyer belt 
and ultimately to a truck. 

The material is then transported to various end-users for use as tire-derived fuel 
(TDF). TDF is mixed with coal as an alternative fuel source to generate electricity. 
The University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) is one location where Missouri 
Vocational Enterprises transports TDF. 
Tires & Tire Chips at Church Farm ^ pyj j ; 5,900 tons of tires were recycled by MVE which can be measured as 
590,000 "passenger tire equivalents". While DNR is the Department of Corrections' main customer, MVE works 
with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT), solid waste management districts, cities, counties, and 
other tax -supported entities. 

State Data Center's Box Reuse Efforts = Savings 

For the past ten years operations staff in the State Data Center (located in the Office of Administration's 
Information Technology Division) have been reusing boxes that are used to ship customer reports and letters to 

state agencies. In fiscal year 2008 it was estimated that the Data Center 
was reusing about 100 boxes each week. By FY1 1 the weekly estimate 
had climbed to 1 75 boxes each week. 




State Data Center Reuse Stats 

FY1 1 Average Boxes Per Day = 25 
FY1 1 Estimated Boxes Reused = 8988 
Estimated Annual Savings = $4,494 



p. 12 



Reuse on the Rise 

Widespread use of the Purchasing Committee (PCOM) listserv in FY1 1 helped agencies to streamline 
the surplus property process. Essentially the listserv is an email distribution list that allows agencies to 
communicate with other state agencies about property that is no longer needed or issue an email to find 
items that they need to acquire. Typically the exchange of property through the listserv does not cost 
state agencies any money. 

Since FY07 the Office of Administration's (OA) Division of Purchasing and Office of Equal Opportu- 
nity have made a coordinated effort to collect 3 -ring binders for redistribution to other state agencies by 
utilizing the PCOM listserv. This has provided other state agencies with the opportunity to save money 
by not having to purchase new notebooks. 

Over the past five years (FY07 - FY1 1) these OA offices 
with approximately 40 employees have distributed 3,176 
notebooks with a total estimated cost avoidance of $5,559. 
This represents one example of how the listserv has made 
reuse of products within state government much easier. 

In order to participate with the Purchasing Committee listserv, a state employee must register with the 
listserv administrator. Since State Surplus Property rules apply to distribution of property via the listserv 
it is a good idea for employees who normally handle disposal of property to register. Here is a web link 
to the registration page http://lists.mo.gov/mailman/listinfo/purchcomm 



RecycleMania is a competition among colleges and universities in the United 
States that provides schools with a fun, proactive opportunity to increase aware- 
ness about waste prevention and recycling on their campus. Over a 10-week 
period, schools compete in different contests to see which institution can collect 
the largest amount of recyclables per capita; the largest amount of total recycla- 
bles; the least amount of trash per capita; or have the highest recycling rate. 

The following Missouri schools participated in the 201 1 national competition: 
Park University; University of Missouri - Kansas City; Missouri University of 
Science & Technology; University of Missouri - Columbia; Missouri State 
University; Washington University in St. Louis; Northwest Missouri State 
University; University of Central Missouri; Missouri Western State Univer- 
sity; University of Missouri - St. Louis; St. Louis University; Webster Univer- 
sity; St. Louis Community College; Maryville University of St. Louis; and 
Fontbonne University. 

The State Recycling Program applauds Missouri's colleges and universities for 
their participation in the national RecycleMania competition! 



p. 13 



OA/DPMM & OEO Notebook Reuse Stats 

Avg. # of notebooks distributed each year = 635 
Avg. Annual Estimated Cost Avoided = $1,112 




State Fair Recycling 

The State Fair marked its fourth year of recycling in 201 1 by working to 
reduce the amount of cardboard, paper, plastic, and aluminum destined 
for the landfill. Each year this process has grown and matured through a 
partnership of the Department of Natural Resources' Solid Waste Man- 
agement Program, Pioneer Trails Solid Waste Management District, the 
Missouri State Fair, Waste Corporation of Missouri, the Missouri Recy- 
cling Association, the Office of Administration's State Recycling Pro- 
gram and many volunteers. 

This year's efforts at the State Fair resulted in 4.93 tons of cardboard 
and 1.17 tons of plastic being diverted from the landfill and over the 
past three years recycling efforts have kept 29,880 lbs. of cardboard and 
5,720 lbs. of plastic out of the landfill. Special containers are provided 
during the Fair to collect these materials. In addition these containers 
are available for use at the various events that occur on the fairgrounds 
throughout the year. 




I TrasM! 

iilw e t rash . org 



State Fair Recycling @ Womans Building 





Cardboard Compactor @ State Fair 



This partnership plans to continue their efforts 
g into the future to not only increase diversion of 
recyclable material from the landfill, but also to 
utilize the State Fair venue as an opportunity to 
educate Missouri's citizens on the economic and 
environmental benefits of recycling. Next year 
the focus will be to inform the patrons and 
vendors of the State Fair about the convenient 
recycling services available on the fairgrounds. 



State Agency Recycling Efforts Avoid Cost of Waste Disposal 

The efforts of agencies statewide resulted in a combined total of 12,782 tons (see chart on p. 8) of 
materials recycled in FY1 1. If this amount of material had been sent to landfills it is estimated the State 
of Missouri would have paid at least $543,235 in waste disposal costs. It is possible to calculate this cost 
avoidance based on the average tipping fee charged to waste haulers in Missouri. Tipping fees are paid 
by waste haulers for each ton of trash disposed in Missouri's landfills. The average tipping fee in 
Missouri was $42.50 per ton in FY1 1 . 

The tipping fee is only one cost of doing business as a waste hauler. In addition to the tipping fee, a 
waste hauler includes labor and transportation costs in the actual amount charged to its customers. 
Therefore, utilizing the average tipping fee to calculate cost avoidance represents a conservative 
estimate. 

p. 14 



FY11 Overview: Recycled Content Procurement 



Recycling Program Guidelines for Buying Recycled 

The State Recycling Program works with agencies to increase procurement of products containing recycled content. This 
is commonly referred to as "closing the loop". Recycling can only be successful if products produced from recyclable 
materials are then purchased. The State Recycling Program has adopted the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) 
"Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines (CPG)" for recycled content products as a roadmap for the State of Mis- 
souri to continue working towards "closing the loop". 

Evaluation Criteria for Products Listed Under CPG: 

• Availability of product 

• Impact of procurement on the solid waste stream 

• Economic and technological feasibility of producing the product 

• Other uses of the recovered materials used to produce the product 

There are 8 categories designated in the CPG. Product categories and individual items in these categories are listed below 
Products identified by the recycling symbol Cs also appear in the Missouri Recycled Products Directory published 

by the Environmental Improvement and Resources Authority's Market Development Program. This publication is a 
good resource for locating recycled products manufactured and distributed in Missouri. Additional information about this 
directory may be found in the "Recycling Resources" section on p. 20 of this report. 

Product Fact Sheets may be found for each of these categories on the internet at the following address: 
http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/factshts.htm 



Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines: Recycled Product Categories 



1. Construction Products 





Building Insulation 


• 


Carpet (polyester) 


• 


Carpet Cushion 


• 


Laminated Paperboard 




Cement & Concrete Containing 




o Coal fly ash 




o Furnace slag 




o Ground granulated blast 




o Cenospheres 




o Silica fume 


• 


Consolidated & Reprocessed Latex 




Paint 


• 


Floor Tiles 


• 


Flowable Fill 


• 


Modular Threshold Ramps 


• 


Nonpressure Pipe 


Ci 


Patio Blocks 


• 


Railroad Grade Crossing Surfaces 


c 


Roofing Materials 




Shower & Restroom 




Dividers/Partitions 


a 


Structural Fiberboard 



2. Landscaping Products 



*- J Compost Made from Yard 
Trimmings or Food Waste 

• Garden & Soaker Hoses 
£j Hydraulic Mulch 

• Lawn & Garden Edging 

« Plastic Lumber Landscaping 
Timbers & Posts 



3. Park & Recreation Products 



6. Vehicular Products 



Ci 


Park Benches & Picnic Tables 




C: 


Plastic Fencing 




a 


Playground Equipment 




C: 


Playground Surfaces 




• 


Running Tracks 




4. Paper Products 






Commercial/Industrial Sanitary Tissue 




(paper towels & toilet paper) 




• 


Miscellaneous Papers 




• 


Newsprint 




Ci 


Paperboard & Packaging Products 


#» 


Printing & Writing Papers 




5. Nonpaper Office Products 


Ci 


Binders, Clipboards, File Folders, Clip 




Portfolios, & Presentation Folders 


Ci 


Office Furniture 




Ci 


Office Recycling Containers 




Ci 


Office Waste Receptacles 




• 


Plastic Desktop Accessories 




• 


Plastic Envelopes 




• 


Plastic Trashbags 




Ci 


Printer Ribbons 




Ci 


Toner Cartridges 





Engine Coolants 
Rebuilt Vehicular Parts 
Re-Refined Lubricating 
Oils 

Retread Tires 



7. Transportation Products 



Channelizers 
Delineators 
Flexible Delineators 
Parking Stops 
Traffic Barricades 
Traffic Cones 



8. Miscellaneous Products 



Awards & Plaques 
Bike Racks 
Blasting Grit 
Industrial Drums 
Manual-Grade Strapping 
Mats 
Pallets 
Signage 

Sorbents 

p. 15 



State Agencies Close the Loop with Paper Procurement 

Paper is the most common recycled product purchased by state agencies. In 1990, RSMo 34.032 established attainment 
goals for state agencies to purchase certain percentages of products made from post-consumer recovered materials. One 
goal was that 60% of paper products purchased by the State of Missouri contain post-consumer materials by the year 
2000. This goal was not achieved in FY1 1 as 54% of the overall paper purchased contained recycled content. 



FY11 Purchases of Recycled Paper Compared 
to Virgin Paper 


Product 
Category 


Recycled 

Paper 
Purchases 


Virgin Paper 
Purchases 


Recycled Paper Purchases 
as a % of Total Purchases in 
Product Category 




FY11 


FY11 


FY11 


FY10 


FY09 


Fine Paper 
Products (office, 
copy,fax) 


$1,487,067 


$2,072,026 


42% 


38% 


43% 


Course Paper 
Products 
(napkins, towels, 
tissues) 


$2,932,427 


$1,670,346 


£LA 0/ 

o47o 


0/ To 




Forms 
(continuous & 
snap out) 


$211,652 


$4,945 


98% 


95% 


95% 


Envelopes (Plain 

/it - l'i'intii/l\ 
ill tllUlKUJ 


$997,585 


$27,737 


97% 


88% 


77% 


Printing by 
contractors (40% 
of total charge is 
attributable to 
paper - figures 
appearing in this 
row represent 
paper cost only) 


$413,646 


$1,363,711 


23% 


44% 


32% 


Overall Totals 


$6,042,377 


$5,138,765 


54% 


56% 


56% 



Environmental Benefits of Buying Recycled Paper 

The State of MO spent $1,487,067 on recycled "Fine Paper Products" in FY1 1. A majority of this paper is printer/copier 
paper made with 30% post-consumer recycled paper. Purchasing this type of recycled paper versus virgin paper 
translates into the following estimated savings: 

« 9,559 trees 

"J 2,788,275 gallons of water 

d 23,899 lbs. of air pollution 

& 1,633,132 kw/hours of electricity 

& 5.5 billion Btu - enough energy to power 53 homes in Missouri for a year! 

Source: www.recycledproducts.org/calculator.html p. 16 



C 



5 



Vehicle Maintenance 
Suppl es 


Tires, Retread 


Remanufactured 
Furniture 


Promotional Items 


Playground Supplies 


Office Supplies 


Nursery Supplies 


Metal Products 


Janitorial Supplies 


Printer Cartridges, 
Remanufactured 


Glass Beads 


Cardboard Boxes 


Carpet/ 
Construction 
Materials 


Batter es- 
Rechargeable 


Antifreeze 


Non-Paper 
Recycled 
Content 
Procurement 
(All Figures 
Reported in 
Dollars) 




















SO 












Auditor's Office 












2,904 




















Treasurer's Office 












Os 
Ui 

© 




















Agriculture 
































Conservation 


1,449 


3,808 








5,459 


2,295 


18,478 


159,249 


153,566 




16,865 




4,738 


Os 

o 


Corrections 
















u> 
so 


u* 


1,429 












Economic Development 


















24,218 


00 
00 

o 




2,081 


107,048 






Elementary & Secondary 
Education 








3,184 








6,176 




7,458 




OS 








Health & Senior Services 
















1,503 


'jt 

00 


7,546 




OS 
OS 

m 








Insurance, Financial 
Inst., Prof. Reg. 




















3,200 












Labor & Industrial 
Relations 






SO 
O 

o 






1,398 


00 

o 




17,089 


34,089 




2,766 


10,076 






Mental Health 








3,673 


7,028 


12,814 






6,107 


11,781 






8,041 


rn 




Natural Resources 












2,277 






1,495 








64,344 






Office of Administration 








12,670 




238,177 




98,110 


23,569 


28,617 




4,242 


6,021 


25,222 




Public Safety 
















4,213,796 




00 

o 












Revenue 
























2,240 








Secretary of State 




















35,878 






66,335 






Social Services 




os 

In* 


















3,141,058 






J 


1,242 


Transportation 


$1,449 


$4,460 


$900 


$19,527 


© 

In* 
00 


$682,196 


$2,475 


$5,207,107 


$731,939 


$288,743 


4- 
© 

00 


$88,878 


$340,957 


$30,489 


$1,302 


TOTALS 



p. 17 



II. FY11 Overview: Missouri's State Recycling Fund 



Missouri's State Recycling Fund was established by RSMo 34.032 
which states that "Proceeds from the sale of recycled 
materials may be used to offset costs of the recycling program." 

Recycling revenues increased 71% from FY 10 to FY1 1 (see chart 
to the right). FY1 1 marked the highest generation of revenues in 
the MO State Recycling Program's (MSRP) history. 

In FY1 1 the MSRP distributed over 10,000 plastic bags to state 
agencies. A majority of these were used to collect aluminum cans 
and plastic bottles with a smaller percentage used for shredded 
paper. In addition, over 450 recycling containers were provided to 
state agencies in FY1 1. A majority of these are being used for 
mixed office paper and the balance of contain- 
ers is used for aluminum can and plastic bottle 
recycling. Other significant purchases made 
with monies from the State Recycling Fund 
included fluorescent lamp recycling services; 
containers for the Department of Revenue's 
paper recycling program; baler supplies and 
maintenance; and supplies for in-vessel compos 
ters located at Ozark Correctional Center and 
Northeast Correctional Center. 



Recycling Fund Summary: FY09-FY11 



S450.000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
$150,000 
$100,000 
$50,000 
$0 




FY09 



I Revenues 



FY10 
I Program Costs 



4.98% 



FY11 Recycling Fund: Sources of Revenue 
5.06% 2.01% 



0.53% 




l Jefferson City = 27.52% 
I Kansas City = .92% 
Dept. of Corrections = 39.44% 
l Dept. of Revenue = 19.54% 
l Printer Cartridges = .53% 
Sec. of State = 4.98% 



Office of Admin. = 5.06% 



Highway Patrol = 2.01% 



The top three sources of revenue in FY1 1 were 
the Department of Corrections (39%), the 
Jefferson City recycling contract (28%) and 
Department of Revenue (20%). (see chart to the 
right) The Department of Corrections (DOC) 
spends a significant amount of recycling funds on consumable products such as plastic bags and baling wire for 
securing bales of recyclable materials. This is due to the high volume of materials that DOC generates and recycles. 

Contributions to the Heating Assistance 
Program (Utilicare) 

Excess revenues from the sale of recyclable materials are transferred 
to the Heating Assistance Program managed by the Department of 
Social Services pursuant to RSMo 34.032. The Heating Assistance 
Program (HAP) - also known as Utilicare - provides financial assis- 
tance to low-income Missourians for heating their homes during 
winter months. The MSRP has transferred a total of $285,000 to the 
HAP since 1995. 



As a result of state employee recycling efforts, the MSRP made a 
$20,000 contribution to the HAP in FY1 1. The $20,000 transferred 
to the HAP in FY1 1 will help approximately 100 households in Mis- 
souri to pay their heating bills. 



Recycling Monies Transferred to Heating Assistance Program: 
FY09-FY11 



$35,000 



$30,000 



$25,000 



$20,000 



$15,000 



$10,000 



$5,000 



$0 



$30,000 



$20,000 



$20,000 





FY09 



FY10 



FY11 



p. 18 



III. State Recycling Program Goals 



FYll Goal 

Goal: Work with the Missouri Interagency Recycling Committee (MIRC) to establish a network of 
recycling teams located at various state facilities. The primary purpose of the recycling team is to 
oversee recycling systems at their location to insure these systems are running effectively. Recycling 
team members will only be responsible for monitoring recycling systems at their place of work. The 
State Recycling Coordinator will work with MIRC to have five teams established by the end of FY1 1. 

Result: The State Recycling Program determined — primarily through interaction with state agencies 
and state facilities — that an informal network of recycling teams already existed. High-functioning 
recycling teams exist in the following Jefferson City locations: Social Services (615 Howerton Ct); 
Natural Resources (1730-38 E. Elm St.); Jefferson Building (205 Jefferson St.); and Truman Building 
(301 W. High St.). 

Planning discussions with MIRC about recycling teams along with the recognition that each of the 
"informal" recycling teams had a unique form of organization led to the realization that efforts to 
formalize these recycling teams would probably not produce many benefits. As a result of these 
discussions it was decided to not pursue formalization of a recycling team network. Existing recycling 
teams can be supported by providing information, solutions, and supplies. 



FY12 Goal 

Goal: Establish a recycling services contract for state agencies in the St. Louis area to recycle com- 
mon office waste products such as paper and cardboard. 



ft- Missouri State 
^Recycling Program 



p. 19 



IV. Recycling Resources 



Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority / Market Development Program 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources 

Internet: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/eiera/mo-market-dev-program.htm 
Email: eiera@dnr.mo.gov 
Phone: 573-751-4919 

The Missouri Recycled Products Directory is published by the Market Development Program. An excellent 
resource for finding Missouri based businesses that manufacture or distribute recycled-content products. The 
directory is available online at http://www.dnr.mo.gov/eiera/mmdp-recycled-products-directory.htm 

Missouri State Recycling Program 
Office of Administration 

Division of Purchasing & Materials Management 

Internet: http://www.oa.mo.gov/purch/recypro.html 
Email: recycling@oa.mo.gov 
Phone: 573-751-2387 

The Missouri State Recycling Program (MSRP) works with state agencies to increase purchases of recycled 
content products, reduce their waste stream and increase collection of materials for recycling. The MSRP web 
page is a good resource for state contracts that offer recycled content products as well as recycling services. 

Solid Waste Management Program 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources 

Internet: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/swmp/index.html 

Email: swmp@dnr.mo.gov 

Phone: 800-361-4827 or 573-751-5401 

The Solid Waste Management Program (SWMP) works with citizens, businesses, industry, and government to 
continue increasing material reuse and recycling. The SWMP web page is an excellent resource for information 
dealing with all aspects of solid waste management in Missouri. 

Missouri Vocational Enterprises (MVE) 
Missouri Department of Corrections 

Internet: http://www.doc.missouri.gov/mve 
Phone: 800-392-8486 or 573-751-6663 

The Department of Corrections vocational training program offers the following products and services that meet 
"buy recycled" criteria. MVE products and services are only available to state agencies and other tax-supported 
entities. 



MVE Recycled-Content Products 

• Cardboard boxes: 60% post-consumer content 

• Plastic bags: 30% recycled material 

• Metal products: 25-35% post-consumer content 

• Toilet paper: 60% recycled material 

• Envelopes: 30% post-consumer content 



p. 20 



MVE Recycling/Remanufacturing/ 
Refurbishing Services 

• Tire Recycling Service 

573-635-3825 

• Toner Cartridge Refill Service 

573-751-3224 ext. 1260 

• Office Panel (cubicle) Refurbishing Service 

573-751-6663 or 800-392-8486